Turning a Customer into a Partner

We learn a lot about an organization when we help it move.

We’re not just talking about its equipment, furniture and supplies. We learn about everything from how its work environment operates to how it uses space to maximize productivity. Most importantly, we learn about where that organization is heading – literally and figuratively – in the future.

That’s why at Hoffberger, we take a lot pride in developing long-term relationships with our commercial moving clients. The better we get to know a client, the more we can help ensure each moving project is as safe and hassle-free as possible.

One of our longest working relationships has been with Johns Hopkins University and Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. Hoffberger has been working with Hopkins for as long as we’ve been an independent company, and several of our senior managers have been helping Hopkins with moves for nearly two decades.

The university and hospital are world-class organizations, right in our backyard, and we are honored they view us as their preferred commercial relocation company. Working with them has also sharpened the expertise we can bring to moving clients in the healthcare, education and life sciences fields.

Some examples of moving projects we’ve completed for Hopkins include:

  • Johns Hopkins University, Carey Business School. We relocated 77,000 square feet of classrooms and offices in a single night.
  • Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Over the years, we have relocated more than 1 million square feet of research facilities.
  • Johns Hopkins Hospital, Pediatric Medical Outpatient Building. We moved the pediatrics group into a 100,000-square-foot new facility in one weekend.
  • Johns Hopkins University, Mt. Washington Campus. This project included approximately 250,000 square feet of various groups and departments.
  • The Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins. We moved the Institute from its old building into a new, 240,000 square-foot building, including clinical and research space. The new building was designed by the renowned architectural firm Ayers Saint Gross.

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